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Gallery assistant, Amato Zinno, dips his roller to finish painting the gallery wall near Damien Hirst’s “Away from the Flock,” a piece from Hirst’s Natural History series that features a lamb in formaldehyde solution.

Kris Craig, The Providence Journal, January 21, 2016

The preparators at the David Winton Bell Gallery at Brown University were busy Thursday afternoon installing the gallery’s upcoming show, “Dead Animals, or the Curious Occurrence of Taxidermy in Contemporary Art”. Jo-ann Conklin, the director of the Bell Gallery, has taken about 3 years putting together the exhibit that concentrates on the use of taxidermy in the work of various contemporary artists. The show opens to the public on Saturday, January 23 and on Feb 5th features a lecture by English artist, Polly Morgan, followed by a reception.

View the full slideshow here: http://www.providencejournal.com/photogallery/PJ/20160121/PHOTOGALLERY/121009999/PH/1

Josef Albers and Hermès Hommage au carré (Homage to the Square): Joy 36” x 36” Edition of 200 Silk twill with a hand rolled hem Gift of Pierre-Alexis Dumas

Josef Albers and Hermès
Hommage au carré (Homage to the Square): Joy
36” x 36”
Edition of 200
Silk twill with a hand rolled hem
Gift of Pierre-Alexis Dumas

One of the more unusual objects found within the Bell Gallery collection is a limited edition Hermès Éditeur silk scarf of Josef Albers’ print, Articulation in the yellow, gray, and white color scheme titled Joy. Hermés chose to collaborate with the Joseph and Anni Albers Foundation in 2006 as the first edition of Hermès Éditeur, a project that aims to display exemplary artist works as editions on silk. Other artists included in the series are Daniel Buren, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Julio Le Parc. The choice of Albers for the first edition was intentional as Pierre-Alexis Dumas, the Hermès Artistic Director states below:

His works are deep reservoirs of sensation, emotions and feelings that take hold of us even when we do not understand them. His work for the Homages to the Square series rests on a simple principle: to create a series of infinite chromatic variations within an unchanging form, the square, composed in a certain way. Editing these six Josef Albers scarves—or silk squares—took us to the limits of our savoir-faire.

Through this project, Hermès pays homage to Albers’ extraordinary sense of color, and his fascination with the precision of edges. The technique Hermés used to print the scarves is known as “frame printing” and engages a difficult technique of “edge to edge” color management, a practice that requires exactitude to prevent the colors from overlapping. In total, Hermès printed six works from Homage to the Square series in editions of 200 each.

The result is profound, and the sense of artistry in the printing is clear. The colors appear luminescent on the silk and the moderate translucency of the fabric when held up to the light offers a dynamic sense of the colors individually and as they interact together. The edges are exact, and it is clear that the transferring of Articulation to silk is not only a replica of a painting; it is a work of art in itself. Though Josef Albers was not involved in the decision to print on silk for this project with Hermès, throughout his career he explored novel ways of manipulating materials and developing color. The collaboration of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation with Hermés took Josef’s artistic ethos into perspective and upheld his philosophy in a dynamic and innovative way.

-Mara Tegethoff

David Winton Bell Gallery-Hank Willis Thomas-4452

Exhibition Curator Alexis Lowry Murray with artist Hank Willis Thomas at the opening of Primary Sources at the David Winton Bell Gallery, List Art Center, Brown University. September 11, 2015. Photograph by Jesse Banks III.

We were delighted to have outgoing Bell Gallery curator Alexis Lowry Murray join us for the opening of Hank Willis Thomas’s exhibition Primary Sources which she curated before she moved to her new post at Dia Art Foundation. Thank you Alexis for your wonderful work with us and for bringing Hank’s work to the University community.

View all the photos of the opening reception here.

Hyperallergic‘s Allison Meier recently wrote a lovely piece on the work of Russian conceptual architectural duo Alexander Brodsky and Ilya Utkin. We a fortunate to have an entire set of prints of their work in the Bell Gallery collection, which you can peruse online here.

Read Allison’s article in full here: http://hyperallergic.com/230423/the-most-fantastic-architecture-of-the-soviet-union-was-built-on-paper/

Untitled 3

Danny Lyon, Demonstrations at an “all-white” swimming pool in Cairo, Illinois, 1962.                             Collection of the David Winton Bell Gallery, Gift of Gary Ginsberg and Susanna Aaron

A selection from the Bell Gallery’s collection of Danny Lyon’s photographers are included in the wonderful online exhibition Changing American RI.

Lyons was the first official photographer of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, and he extensively documented the civil rights movement.

The exhibition produced Brown University’s Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice and the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage, with significant support from the Rhode Island Historical Society, was organized in conjunction with the Smithsonian’s traveling exhibition Changing America: The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863 and the March on Washington, 1963. 

Check it out at changingamerica-cssj.org.

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