IMG_0775

This weekend, visitors to the Gallery joined artist John C Gonzalez for a sculpture workshop to participated in Installation Box, Version 4, 2016 as part of the exhibition Works well with others. Participants worked with Gonzalez to assemble new sculptures from the boxed sets of standardized materials. Completed sculptures are on display in the Gallery through June 12th.

Thank you to all the participants for joining and for sharing your work with us for the remainder of the exhibition.

 

IMG_0736

John meets participants of the first Installation Box workshop.

 

IMG_0740

John brings boxes to Lee and Devin.

 

IMG_0770

John works with Mary to organize components from the box.

 

IMG_0778

Completed sculptures on view through June 12, 2016.

 

Bacon-Leiris

Francis Bacon, Portrait of Michael Leiris, 1976
Aquatint, 11.75″ x 9.875″
Gift of Kenneth A. Cohen

 

Infamous during his life and raised to mythic proportions in death, the work of Francis Bacon (1909–1992) defined an era of British painting. He built his oeuvre using provoking, and at times unsettling imagery. Thrown out of the house at sixteen, Bacon sought out a reality all his own. While living in Paris and Berlin as a young man before he began his career as a painter, he would have been able to see the work of post-impressionists, cubists, surrealists, constructivists, and examples of the Bauhaus Movement first hand. His style was highly influenced by his exposure to Picasso during this period, and was inspired by the freedom with which Picasso abstracted the forms of the body.

It was not until the 1930s that he began to practice as an artist. Bacon worked primarily with oil on canvas and was for the most part self-taught. Bacon was known for being keenly perceptive of all that was occurring around him, and once described himself as “a pulverizing machine” in regards to the way he consumed images.[1] Pictures of his studio reveal hundreds of photographs and magazine cut outs, covering the walls and piled in corners. He approached his source imagery through a purely aesthetic lens; appropriating a pastiche of photographic representations from a variety of sources to blend with the figural representation of his sitters.

Executed in 1976, the Bell Gallery’s print of Portrait of Michel Leiris exemplifies the style Bacon developed later in his career. Where his early work is regarded as carnal and violent, the portraits he produced in the 1970s and onward display a relatively tranquil depiction of their subjects. The figures often appear on a flat, cool colored background, compared to the confining environments and the florid reds and oranges he frequently employed to surround his subjects earlier in his career. The increased stability of the images he produced at this point parallels the footing he found late in his later career while being managed by the Marlborough Gallery and exhibited internationally as the greatest British painter since J.M.W. Turner.[2]

Michel Leiris (1901–1990) was a prominent 20th-century French surrealist writer, ethnographer, poet, art critic, and a close friend of Bacon’s. During his career he sat at the nexus of many strands of French intellectualism. By the end of the1920s Leiris was a colleague of the dissident surrealist George Bataille and frequently contributed to his magazine Documents. Bacon and Leiris met frequently whenever the former visited Paris, and Leiris is credited with influencing Bacon’s worldview. In 1983 Leiris published an illustrated monograph on Bacon’s work.

In the rendering of Michel Leiris his face is recognizable through the abstraction, though it appears as if the features of two or three people have been combined with those of his own. The portrait rests on a flat dark background that encroaches on the figure, bleeding into the forms of the face. This later portrait was rendered in pastel before being reproduced as a print, as was common in Bacon’s work during the 1980s.[3] Bacon’s portraits present a hybrid of figuration and abstraction, producing a new altered reality that attempts to express the psychological condition of the sitter over traditional mimetic representation.

– Maya Code-Williams ’16

 

[1] Domino, Christophe, and Ruth Verity Sharman, Francis Bacon: Painter of a Dark Vision, (New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1997) 57.

[2] Tate Britain, “Artist Biography: Francis Bacon 1909-1992” tate.org.uk, http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/francis-bacon-682 (accessed November 21, 2015)

[3] “BACON, Francis.” Benezit Dictionary of Artists. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press, accessed April 21, 2016, http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/benezit/B00009707.

 

121400-full

We are delighted to announce that Lee Bontecou’s work Untitled 1962 has arrived and is on display at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel in L.A. as part of their exhibition Revolution in the Making: Abstract art by Women, 1947-2016.

You can hear a lovely audio piece about the exhibition here: http://www.scpr.org/programs/the-frame/2016/03/11/47152/go-inside-the-arts-district-s-massive-new-hauser-w/

PH-121009999.jpg&Maxw=583-1

Gallery assistant, Amato Zinno, dips his roller to finish painting the gallery wall near Damien Hirst’s “Away from the Flock,” a piece from Hirst’s Natural History series that features a lamb in formaldehyde solution.

Kris Craig, The Providence Journal, January 21, 2016

The preparators at the David Winton Bell Gallery at Brown University were busy Thursday afternoon installing the gallery’s upcoming show, “Dead Animals, or the Curious Occurrence of Taxidermy in Contemporary Art”. Jo-ann Conklin, the director of the Bell Gallery, has taken about 3 years putting together the exhibit that concentrates on the use of taxidermy in the work of various contemporary artists. The show opens to the public on Saturday, January 23 and on Feb 5th features a lecture by English artist, Polly Morgan, followed by a reception.

View the full slideshow here: http://www.providencejournal.com/photogallery/PJ/20160121/PHOTOGALLERY/121009999/PH/1

Josef Albers and Hermès Hommage au carré (Homage to the Square): Joy 36” x 36” Edition of 200 Silk twill with a hand rolled hem Gift of Pierre-Alexis Dumas

Josef Albers and Hermès
Hommage au carré (Homage to the Square): Joy
36” x 36”
Edition of 200
Silk twill with a hand rolled hem
Gift of Pierre-Alexis Dumas

One of the more unusual objects found within the Bell Gallery collection is a limited edition Hermès Éditeur silk scarf of Josef Albers’ print, Articulation in the yellow, gray, and white color scheme titled Joy. Hermés chose to collaborate with the Joseph and Anni Albers Foundation in 2006 as the first edition of Hermès Éditeur, a project that aims to display exemplary artist works as editions on silk. Other artists included in the series are Daniel Buren, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Julio Le Parc. The choice of Albers for the first edition was intentional as Pierre-Alexis Dumas, the Hermès Artistic Director states below:

His works are deep reservoirs of sensation, emotions and feelings that take hold of us even when we do not understand them. His work for the Homages to the Square series rests on a simple principle: to create a series of infinite chromatic variations within an unchanging form, the square, composed in a certain way. Editing these six Josef Albers scarves—or silk squares—took us to the limits of our savoir-faire.

Through this project, Hermès pays homage to Albers’ extraordinary sense of color, and his fascination with the precision of edges. The technique Hermés used to print the scarves is known as “frame printing” and engages a difficult technique of “edge to edge” color management, a practice that requires exactitude to prevent the colors from overlapping. In total, Hermès printed six works from Homage to the Square series in editions of 200 each.

The result is profound, and the sense of artistry in the printing is clear. The colors appear luminescent on the silk and the moderate translucency of the fabric when held up to the light offers a dynamic sense of the colors individually and as they interact together. The edges are exact, and it is clear that the transferring of Articulation to silk is not only a replica of a painting; it is a work of art in itself. Though Josef Albers was not involved in the decision to print on silk for this project with Hermès, throughout his career he explored novel ways of manipulating materials and developing color. The collaboration of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation with Hermés took Josef’s artistic ethos into perspective and upheld his philosophy in a dynamic and innovative way.

-Mara Tegethoff

%d bloggers like this: