The David Winton Bell Gallery is excited to announce our recent acquisition of three photos by Graciela Iturbide – Mujer Ángel, Procesión, and Prótesis. Widely considered to be one of the most important Mexican photographers working today, Iturbide’s work focuses on female, indigenous, and intersectional identities in Mexico. Best known for her work in Zapotec, Mixtec, and Seri Indian communities, her black and white images of rituals, festivals, death, and the ephemera of everyday life often depict the overlap of traditional practices and the contemporary world.

Perhaps the best example of this intersection occurs in her most famous work, Mujer Ángel. This wistful, iconic image depicts a Seri woman running through the Sonora desert along the Arizona / Mexico border. Though she is dressed in provincial garb and surrounded by a vast, open desert, Iturbide’s “angel woman” carries what appears to be a boom box. This playful subversion of viewer expectations of separation between the traditional and the modern becomes a subtle yet striking indication of the dynamism and hybridity of her subject.

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A lifelong feminist, Iturbide depicts her female protagonists as bold, independent, and powerful—even when they are not physically present. Images in her El baño de Frida (Frida’s Bathroom) series demonstrate the posthumous yet larger than life persona of Frida Kahlo, simply by documenting her things. Iturbide’s only series to contain color photographs, El baño de Frida allows the intense pigments and intimate objects in Kahlo’s bathroom—kept locked for over fifty years following her death—to reanimate the artist. Specifically, the depiction of Kahlo’s festively painted leg brace in Prótesis (prosthesis) reminds a viewer of both the vibrant quality of Kahlo’s work and the great mental and physical pain she channeled into it. In this way, Iturbide not only documents the space but also pays homage to Kahlo’s life, death, and continued aesthetic influence in Mexican culture.

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In seeking to understand Mexico in its totality—that is, composed of dynamic, diverse, and intersectional cultural practices—Iturbide embeds herself in the communities she depicts. As a result of the time and intimacy she devotes to her subjects, her images are empathetic and respectful, but also frequently bizarre, unexpected, or surreal. Procesión (procession) can be read as an allegory to this deeply relational process, in that the viewer and Iturbide herself seem to be swallowed up in an eerie throng of masked people. This sense of being immersed in a confusing yet amazing social gathering includes the viewer in the ritual yet reminds them of their need for greater interpersonal connection in order to understand it. In this way, works like Procesión resist simplification and stereotyping, and thusly demand a continued relationship with the subject matter.

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Graciela Iturbide began her nearly fifty year long career under the mentorship of renowned photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo at la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. She holds honorary degrees from Columbia College and San Francisco Art Institute and has been the recipient of the Lucie Award, the Hasselblad Foundation Photography Award, the Legacy Award from the Smithsonian Latino Center, and a prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship. Her work has been exhibited in major exhibitions at Tate Modern, Museo Frida Kahlo, Museo de Arte Moderno, and the J. Paul Getty Museum, and is part of permanent collections at LACMA, the Brooklyn Museum, MoMA, SFMoMA, Yale University Art Gallery, and the Centre Georges Pompidou. She currently lives and works in Coyoacán, Mexico.

– Rica Maestas
Public Human

We are excited to announce our latest additions to the David Winton Bell Gallery collection – Untitled (woman touching man’s face) and Untitled (smoking) from Carrie Mae Weems’ The Kitchen Table Series. Generally considered to be one of Weems’ most important bodies of work, The Kitchen Table Series paved the way for a generation of contemporary artists to explore issues of representation. She frames her content, comprised of themes like racism, sexism, identity, and politics, with a nuance that introduces humanity into conversations often dominated by idealizations and abstractions. According the artist herself, her artwork situates the concept of social inclusion in the context of the “complex, dimensional human experience.”[i]

Confronting the exclusion of black women and families from generalizable representation in mainstream media, The Kitchen Table Series empathetically depicts the intimacy and complexity of familial relationships. Consisting of twenty images of the artist with her lover, friends, and daughter around a brightly lit table, Weems frames the Black experience as something universal and deeply relatable. However, despite the organic tenderness these images convey, these compassionate moments are in fact planned, cast, and expertly crafted. According to Weems, the interplay between the sincere and the staged derives from her interest in constructed histories, storytelling, and the performance of identity rather than mere autobiography.[ii]

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The performativity and constructed quality of identity is particularly evident in the juxtaposition of the two new acquisitions. In Untitled (woman touching man’s face), Weems frames herself as a quintessential caring spouse who puts the needs of her male companion above her own. She focuses all her attention on her lover as he eats, touching neither her own dinner nor her wine. The birdcage behind them can be read as indexing her familial position as that of a domesticated woman whose life depends on her lover and her position in the home. By contrast, Untitled (smoking) places Weems in a position of authority at the head of the table, flanked by images of Malcolm X and black power. While she looks shrewdly at her companion and holds her cards close to her chest, a viewer can see her partner’s hand perfectly, placing his vulnerability in stark contrast with her guarded confidence. Depicting two very different feminine identities embodied by one woman, Weems transforms her own visage into a dynamic, complex, and universally relatable character.

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Though Weems also works with text, fabric, audio, digital images, and installation video, she is best known for her work in photography. Weems holds a BA from the California Institute of the Arts, where she studied with artists including Robert Morris, Anna Halprin, and John Cage. She received her MFA from the University of California, San Diego and also participated in a graduate program in folklore at the University of California, Berkeley. She has been the recipient of the prestigious MacArthur “Genius” Grant and a Ford Fellowship, as well numerous residencies and visiting professor positions. She exhibits globally, most notably at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Tate Museum in London, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. Currently, she lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

– Rica Maestas
Public Human

[i] Tidwell, Daniel. “Seeing the Unseen Carrie Mae Weems.” Nashville Arts Magazine 20 June 2013. Web. 14 Apr. 2017.

[ii] “Carrie Mae Weems By Dawoud Bey” BOMB Magazine, 2009. Web. 14 Apr. 2017.

 

March 23, 2017

We, the directors of the Northeast Small College Art Museum Association (NESCAMA), are deeply concerned about potential budget cuts that threaten funding so vital to us and to the good work that arts organizations do throughout the nation. We must continue to hold the line and to promote the arts energetically through the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

With small operational budgets, college and university art museums are particularly reliant on funding from the NEH, NEA, and IMLS. This funding preserves artistic, ethnographic, scientific, and historic collections, and creates access to cultural heritage unique to our respective diverse communities. This funding not only supports essential infrastructure, it enables us to pursue transformative programs that provide employment for emerging and young professionals. This funding ensures that our collections are interpreted, understood, and valued.

College and university art museums are uniquely — and importantly  — positioned to make connections beyond the fine arts, to include disciplines from science to business, and to foster engagement beyond campus and into our communities. Our work inspires scholarship and engenders innovation. Our museums provide opportunities for young scholars to explore ideas and worlds that are challenging, encouraging critical thinking that will be of use in any professional path they choose to follow after graduation.

During this era of increasing polarization, museums, through their collections and exhibitions, demonstrate that there are multiple points of view and that these points of view can coexist.

While the debate about federal funding for the arts is nothing new,  we encourage members of Congress to recognize that the resilience of the NEH, NEA, and IMLS, despite opposition over the years, is a testament to their enduring value.

Signed,

Dan Mills, Director
Bates Museum of Art, Bates College

Anne Collins Goodyear & Frank H. Goodyear, Co-Directors
Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Bowdoin College

Sharon Corwin, Carolyn Muzzy Director and Chief Curator
Colby College Museum of Art, Colby College

Jo-Ann Conklin, Director
David Winton Bell Gallery, Brown University

Lisa Fischman, Ruth Gordon Shapiro ’37 Director
Davis Museum at Wellesley College

Clare I. Rogan, Curator
Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University

James Mundy, The Anne Hendricks Bass Director
The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College

Ian Berry, Dayton Director
The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College

Anja Chávez, Director of University Museums
Longyear Museum of Anthropology/Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University

David E. Little, Director & Chief Curator
Mead Art Museum at Amherst College

Richard Saunders, Director
Middlebury College Museum of Art, Middlebury College

Tricia Y. Paik, Florence Finch Abbott Director
Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, Mount Holyoke College

Kristina L. Durocher, Director
Museum of Art, University of New Hampshire

Janie Cohen, President, Board of Directors
New England Museum Association

Kristin Parker, Interim Director
The Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University

Tracy L. Adler, Johnson-Pote Director
Ruth and Elmer Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College

Jessica Nicoll, Director and Louise Ines Doyle ’34 Chief Curator
Smith College Museum of Art, Smith College

Christina Olsen, Class of 1956 Director
Williams College Museum of Art, Williams College

Lisa Parola

Politically motivated violence, the political use of violence, violence as agitation, precarious violence, wide-spread violence, subaltern violence. Stressing that there cannot be a single interpretation to any of these phenomena, Fatma Bucak creates works that require a timely ethic derived from the relationship between the political, the poetic, and those who watch. The artist’s recent works evokes themes such as oppression, censorship, grief of disappearances and political violence.

Considering the complex tangle of facts and narratives around issues of political violence, this ethic is particularly evident in Remains of what has not been said: a series of photographs chronicling the collecting and processing of Turkish newspapers over 84 days beginning on 7 February 2016. This date marks the Cizre basement killings in south-eastern Turkey, a moment of fear and contradiction that typifies emotions still present across Turkey and Europe. The newspapers collected over the course of 84 days are visualized first as a video performance entitled Scouring the press in which two women and the artist wash the newspaper pages until they are opaque and devoid of content. Accompanying this video performance is a photographic series in which the artist is seen holding 84 glass jars containing the resulting blackened, spoiled water.

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Fatma Bucak, Detail of installation view of Remains of what has not been said, 2016. Eighty-four digital archival pigment prints. This work was made possible through the generous support of the Fondazione Sardi Per l’Arte, Torino.

Questions arise. How do you put art in conversation with current affairs, not just in Turkey, but across the world? And perhaps more pressingly what is the role of art and the artist in recent decades of violence and serious violations of human rights? In the first decade of the millennium, these topics have become the subject of much research by artists and curators who for various reasons have intervened on issues such as politics, communication, violence, and censorship. They approach political violence from specific cultural contexts that are increasingly market-oriented, investment-centric, and obviously embedded in spectacle, which diminishes the function of civil and political art and culture.

By contrast, Bucak’s recent work proposes artwork and the exhibition as a space for debate and reflection. In Europe and internationally, such interrogation has centered on two lines of research: the re-reading of parts of history and the documentation of facts looking forward. Bucak’s works engage both of these themes through a dialogue between art and current events. Her projects interrogate what is happening in Mediterranean countries and the surrounding region, poetically demand changes in perspectives, practices, and policies—exploring that fragile relationship full of gray areas between what has been, what is, and what will be.

The horizons in Remains of what has not been said gesture towards the boundaries and geographies that are increasingly difficult to define, and they challenge the rationalism of cartography. History has frayed, geographically speaking, and it is no longer possible to represent it as a closed geometry. Dismissing rhetoric and clichés that all too often accompany reflections on culture and art—especially regarding marginalized groups—Bucak deals with specific situations that bring out unexpected perspectives, suppressed facts, liminal places, inhabited borders, flexible time, and narrative geographies. Immersed in this tarnished landscape of political violence, her works do not merely present the public with a depiction of a temporary event, but they also provide a glimpse of what violence conceals. This prompts new interpretations and the opportunity to reexamine history, the present, and our place in it.

Bucak’s work reminds us that art and culture are transversal concepts that address memory, identity, testimonies and collective experience. Art can be a medium for questioning the past, but it must be able to establish a critical distance. Linear understandings of cultural identity promote simplicity at the expense of the very real complexity of what is happening around us. If we understand art as a space for political discussion, never before have images had so much potential as conceptual “resignification tools” to respond to crisis and failing paradigms of modernity. Art as political action during this global transition cannot simply represent what is. Art must also challenge reality and the power structures that underpin it, and ultimately art must challenge its own borders.

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Chitra Ganesh has made her name in the art world by defamiliarizing canonical narratives—integrating popular imagery like Bollywood posters, anime, and comic books with lesser known Hindu and Buddhist icons as well as 19th century European fairly tales. The resulting images participate in the nuanced conversation surrounding contemporary imperialism, subalternity, and the subversion of power. Specifically, much of Ganesh’s work engages with the colonial Indian term junglee, which literally translates to “of the jungle.” Though the idiom is traditionally used to denote women who are perceived as wild, defiant, or transgressive, Ganesh utilizes the term to empower her female protagonists who often include pin-ups, priestesses, warriors, witches, mothers, and goddesses.1

Her mixed media collage, Cat Women Series, epitomizes this kitschy, enigmatic, and complex style, making use of handmade paper, embroidery, drawing, and painting, as well as a wealth of inscrutable folkloric references. While bizarre and slippery, Cat Women Series seems to deal with conflicting expectations of femininity in practical application. Though the smoking, nude, headless, and three-breasted heroine appears to be running, given the position of her leg and athletic footwear, her other leg has been taken over by an enormous rose—a clichéd indicator of romantic love in Western traditions. In this struggle between running and the rose, the protagonist is reproachfully monitored by an open book, which may indicate expectations of female independence derived from higher education or the omnipresence of patriarchal narratives. Overall, the work imparts a vibrant sense of stasis—trapped headless between domineering narratives, expectant love, and an enormous plume of smoke—that can be read as a commentary on the condition of being a woman in post-colonial post-modernity.

Ganesh has remained relatively close-lipped about the exact meanings of her pieces. In fact, she has stated that she intends her images to have “friction” and “dissonance” between text and image, which contributes significantly to the general sense of mystery and peculiarity in her work.2 She has however been very clear about her intent to confront and subvert traditional power dynamics through her work by privileging “buried narratives or marginalized figures typically excluded from official canons of history, literature, and art.”3

Ganesh has exhibited widely in the United States and abroad and has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, Art Matters Foundation Grant, and a Columbia University Dean’s Fellowship. She is currently a collaborator with artist Miriam Ghani on the Index of the Disappeared, an ongoing so-called “parasitic archive” of the disappearance of immigrant, ‘other,’ and dissenting communities post-9/11. She received her MFA in painting from Columbia University and her undergraduate degree in Comparative Literature and Art-Semiotics from Brown.

– Rica Maestas

1Gopenath, Gayatri. “Chitra Ganesh’s Queer Re-Visions.” GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies (2009): 469.
2Ibid., 471.
3Ibid., 469.

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The David Winton Bell Gallery is excited to announce a new addition to our collection – Vik Muniz’s George Stinney Jr., Album. Known for his playful work in experimental media, this highly influential Brazilian artist reimagines popular imagery—like Warhol’s screenprints of the Mona Lisa or Hans Namuth’s photos of Jackson Pollock—in substances like chocolate syrup, sugar, spaghetti, peanut butter and jelly, and industrial garbage. The often deceiving and optically manipulated photographs of these experimental compositions have been exhibited in contemporary art establishments world-wide, notably at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, and El Museu de Arte Moderna in Sao Paulo.

In his Album series, Muniz utilizes thousands of second-hand-store scrapbook pictures to construct larger images of common personal themes—childhood photos, vacation snapshots, a candid moment with a loved one. In addition to adding a painterly texture to each rendition, the use of deconstructed photographs to compose a larger image emphasizes the universality of experience and introduces a historic depth to ordinary moments.

The iconic mug shot of George Stinney Jr., the youngest person in United States history to be put to death, presents a marked departure from the otherwise mundane family-style images of the Album series. Created in 2016, Muniz’s poignant collage comes at a time of renewed concern over the extent of institutional racism in the United States. At 14 years old, Stinney was convicted of the murder of two white children in what was later deemed to be a racially-biased and unconstitutional trial in South Carolina.1 The integration of Stinney’s loaded mug shot in a series containing otherwise “normal” images of white America can be seen as distinguishing the everyday experience of black Americans as one of constant threat of legal persecution.

Active in social justice movements across the globe, Muniz has received the Crystal Award from the World Economic Forum and a UNESCO nomination as a Goodwill Ambassador. His documentary Waste Land (2010) about the catadores, or collectors of recyclables, working in the largest garbage dump in the world won Best Film at the Sundance Film Festival and earned a nomination for an Academy Award.2 After completing construction on Escola Vidigal, his school of art and technology for low income youth in Rio de Janeiro, Muniz has been a featured guest speaker at the TED Conference, Yale University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Museum of Modern Art, among others. He currently splits his time between New York and Rio de Janeiro.

– Rica Maestas
Public Human

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[1] Bever, Lindsey. “It Took 10 Minutes to Convict 14-year-old George Stinney Jr. It Took 70 Years after His Execution to Exonerate Him.” The Washington Post, 18 Dec. 2014. Web. 14 Sept. 2016.

[2] “WASTE LAND” http://www.wastelandmovie.com. Almega Projects, n.d. Web.

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